Spotted any badgers in Dulwich recently? Researcher looking for help.

Andrew Lynch is undertaking an investigation into badgers in South London for academic research.  Further information is given below.

If you have any information about badgers in your area, please let him know – contact email below.

Andrew Lynch is seeking information for academic research.  He is in the final year of his MSc in Environmental Management (Countryside Management / Protected Area Management) at Birkbeck, University of London under the supervision of Dr. David Dawson.

For his dissertation he is researching the range / former range of Badgers in the Great North Wood and identifying reasons for their success / decline. He is looking for information about the distribution of badgers in South East London. Particularly in the area south of the river from New Cross to East Croydon and over to Streatham Common. He is looking for information about:

The current distribution / presence of badgers in the area including private gardens, rail cuttings e.t.c. Historic records of badgers in the area.

Have you ever seen any badger activity in your area?  Or heard any stories over the years? He is aware that badgers are vulnerable to human disturbance and prejudice and he will be careful with any sensitive information on the current location of setts.

Andrew Lynch

helloandrewlynch@gmail.com

Here’s Andrew’s research statement:

 

I am researching the range / former range of Badgers (Meles meles) in the Great North Wood and identifying reasons for their success / decline. The Great North Wood was a natural oak forest that covered most of the area from Camberwell to Croydon in South East London. The history of the woods is reflected in local place names such as Norwood, Woodside and Forest Hill. Today, some isolated patches of the forest remain, such as Dulwich Upper Wood, Dulwich Woods, Sydenham Hill Woods and Beaulieu Heights in South Norwood. The Great North Wood was once a working woodland and would have supported a large population of badgers. Again, this is reflected in local names such as Brockley and Brockwell – Brocc being the old English name for badger.