Eastlands Crescent – is it Vandalism?

On Eastlands Crescent residents are fighting a planning application to demolish one of the original 1930s detached homes and replace with x2 new houses. (Southwark application no. 19/AP/0946).
Eastlands is a complete street of 1930s houses built on the site of the old Eastlands House. The house in question is one of a group four identical detached 1930s homes on the street and shares the plot with a large protected Oak tree.
Unfortunately Southwark Council has already indicated to the developer that 2x new houses would be acceptable in principle (and therefore demolition of the existing home) and Dulwich Estate have no power to stop demolition,  but the good news is there is still time left before the council make a final decision.
There are many negative aspects to the development such as its massive scale, asymmetric and incongruent design, inappropriately high density and the significant loss of amenity, but most worrying is the fundamental threat to the preservation of Dulwich Village conservation area if an original period single dwelling of nearly 100 years old is allowed to be demolished, setting a precedent for other speculative developers looking to make a profit in Dulwich.
If residents feel they would like to support Eastlands Crescent residents feelings on this matter and make a comment, then follow the link below to the Southwark Council website. The statutory expiry date for comments was coming Monday 19th May, however comments will be accepted thereafter until a decision is made.
To make a comment on the application:

Dulwich Village Independent Businesses take centre stage

Dulwich Village was long known for its healthy range of shops run by locals.  Some can still remember that the Village once had a much wider range of shops.  It was a destination for shoppers within Dulwich and beyond seeking a wide range of fresh food including fruit & vegetables and fresh meats.

Many such locally run shops have gone.  Only recently the last remaining grocer closed, causing great inconvenience to locals who depended on it. Higher and higher rents demanded by the Dulwich Estate landlord, attracted by high value tenants such as corporate chains and  estate agents, have made it hard for neighbourhood shops to continue.

In this environment, it is wonderful to see that our independent businesses are doing well and that they are strengthening by working together.  They depend on us shopping with them.

Enjoy this video about our Dulwich Village independent businesses.

Published on 25 Feb 2018

In this documentary I interviewed shop owners in Dulwich Village about the importance of independent businesses to the local area and what they liked about their local community. Part of a series of blogs promoting independent businesses in the London Borough of Southwark, Supported by Creation trust & Southwark Council. View the rest of the documentaries here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRgf… Shot and edited by myself. Researcher Will Akinnuoye. Special thanks to the contributors: Anne Halmer Hazel Broadfoot Brian Green Patrick Belton Keeley Turner Executive Produced By Patrischia Warmington. Music: Blue Dot Sessions – Town Market

Picture Gallery Pavilion noise worries for residents


The Dulwich Gallery wants to erect a Pavilion in its grounds for the summer and has applied to the Council for permission.  It also wants a licence for alcohol and late operating.

It is the 200th Anniversary of the Gallery so of course they want to celebrate.  However, the amenity of residents will be affected in one way or another and particularly in Edward Alleyn House, Woodyard Lane (who heard the outdoor Belair House and Park Cinema noise on summer evenings in the past), College Gardens and College Road as well as Turney and Burbage Roads.

The Pavilion is temporary but there is no date for its removal and if it is a commercial success it could reappear next year or remain in place.  The Gallery is understood to be looking for business hirers for summer parties.  This is in addition to events such as weddings which are regularly held there.  Included in the Gallery’s application to the council is cinema, dance, live and recorded music, a bar and other events.  The Gallery does not say how frequently it plans to hold these events except that the application covers the months of June, July and August, every weekend and every evening in the week.

The Pavilion has no insulation against noise and neither would a marquee.  There are precedents locally – Edward Alleyn Club and the Velodrome – where there have been successful negotiations with residents about events impinging on them.  This is what the Gallery should consider in this instance, particularly if strong feelings develop about its proposals. 
The Gallery should have approached residents in advance of its application to the council.  As it has not done so, now is the time to tell the council and the councillors.

If a resident is happy with the plans there is no need to do anything.

Front gardens in ugly Turney Road

Front garden layouts are a bugbear of Turney Road – ugly with so many unsightly car parks standing brutally in front of our fine Edwardian houses.

However with the influx of new residents paying high prices for their homes and investing even more into them, there has been a welcome increased resident acknowledgement that frontages are detracting from their homes and from the street.

In response the Scheme of Management has provided an example front garden layout for the houses in Turney Road, that are unable to comply with the Scheme of Management Guidelines for Hardstandings due to the small size of the front garden.  The example drawing is below and more information is on its website.  They form the basis of the Manager’s approach to an application to redesign a front garden.  Any queries should be referred to Nina Rees at the Scheme of Management office.

0206_001-1

Where residents intend to park a car on a forecourt they will need to apply to Southwark Council for permission to create a new entry into the highway – from the forecourt into the road.  The Council can give approval under planning and highways legislation to create a new kerb crossover onto the road.  The crossover is recognised by its ‘dropped’ kerb edge.

SG Smith site – latest

McCullogh Homes completed the purchase of the S G Smith site late last week.

We have spoken to the company and offered our help to make sure residents are aware of what was being planned and timescale.

The company was  unaware that there are several residents’ associations around the site, Gilkes Crescent, Calton Avenue, Court Lane & Turney Road.

We need a lead resident to be the contact point for us.

The company has confirmed the following:

  • Its current intention is to build the scheme as consented.
  • It will be using its own architect to prepare the drawings and not Pantur Hudspith – they are currently checking the layouts relative to the site survey.
  • It intends to leave the existing buildings as they are for now – without a hoarding as they consider that they are secure – and they are alarmed.
  • It may, subject to agreeing a rent, use the rear part of the old show room as a site office.
  • It is very unlikely to start work before the beginning of next year
  • It is fully aware of the number of planning conditions that they are required to have approved before work starts.

Any resident who wishes to be our lead on this important development at the centre of the Village please contact us through the site.

Half Moon – The Future – Reopening early 2017

Statement from Fuller’s – 8 June 2016

THE HALF MOON – THE FUTURE

Update on The Half Moon, Herne Hill

As it’s been a while since we received planning, I thought it was time that I updated you all on what’s happening at The Half Moon in Herne Hill.

You might be wondering why we’ve not started work yet – so I thought it would be worth explaining where we are in the process. As The Half Moon is a Grade II* listed building, we had to apply for planning permission and listed buildings consent. We are now in the process of liaising with the planning authority to discharge conditions pertaining to this approval. This includes aspects such as how we are going to deal with any noise created by the venue, details of the joinery repairs we want to make and what bricks and roof tiles we want to use – in this case, we have to supply samples too, to make sure they fit with the listed building consent.

As you can imagine, this process takes a long time – and we are unlikely to be on site before August at the earliest. We are legally not allowed to start anything until we have successfully discharged all the conditions and the planning authority is 100% happy.
Once we do start, the build is going to take about four months. During that time, we also need to appoint a General Manager and start to hire a team to provide the exceptional level of service we offer in all our pubs. And, of course, we need to hire a Head Chef and a kitchen team.

As you may remember, we had hoped to be open in the autumn – but as the planning elements are taking so much longer than anticipated, realistically we won’t be open until early in 2017.

I know this is disappointing – for both the residents of Herne Hill and for us – but I hope you can understand that when you are dealing with a property that has as much history and heritage as The Half Moon, these things often take more time than expected.
I hope you will all bear with us – and I look forward to welcoming you all to The Half Moon in the new year.

Regards,
Jonathon Swaine Managing Director – Fuller’s Inns

http://www.fullers.co.uk/pubs/pubs-articles/half-moon-herne-hill
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Fuller’s were granted an alcohol licence on 8th June 2016 by Southwark Council.  Full details including conditions are published on the Southwark Council Licensing Register.

Sainsbury’s moving into Dulwich Village – please protect the heritage shopping parade

Village residents are concerned that Sainsbury’s hasn’t done enough to protect the heritage features of Dulwich Village and are insisting on adopting their usual orange logo which does not sit easily with the rest of the heritage frontage on the Dulwich Village high street.

Southwark planning officers are recommending granting planning consent.  Village residents have written to the planning committee to request a rethink on the size and colour of the Sainsbury’s logo in Dulwich Village to ensure it is in keeping with the other businesses on the shopping parade.Letter to Planning Committee

The planning application will be heard at Southwark Planning Sub-Committee A, 6.30pm on Tuesday 5th April, 160 Tooley Street