St Christopher’s Hospice Capital Campaign

This year St Christopher’s Hospice is celebrating the 50th year since Dame Cicely Saunders opened the hospice at Sydenham. So beginning the hospice movement, now with over 200 hospices in the UK and 500 worldwide. Her work focused on the trilogy of care, education and research.

In the last few years the wards have been completely refurbished and the communal areas of the hospice.   To recognise this major milestone the hospice has decided to focus on the learning aspect of her trilogy.

It has opened a special Capital Campaign to focus on building a new world class Centre of Learning.  Here the hospice will develop its educational programme to train many more people to care for the dying, and to develop the most effective ways to help individuals and their families at the end of their lives.

St Christopher’s is probably the biggest provider of training and learning for end of life care (EoLC) in the world.  But there is so much more to be done. This new centre will not only train many more professionals, but also offer opportunities to families, friends, and carers to develop the skills and confidence they need to care for their loved ones at home.  This learning will not only be face-to-face, but will utilise all the advantages of the internet to widen access nationally and internationally.

Our neighbour, Dr Tyrrell Evans, has been a Trustee of the hospice for many years until very recently, and he would like to invite friends and neighbours in Burbage Road to an Information evening about the plans for the Learning Hub and the future of the hospice at his home on Sunday January 14th between 5-7pm. Refreshments will be provided.

Anyone interested and able to come that evening should email him at tyrrellevans@doctors.org.uk.  If you cannot make this date but would like to learn more about the Campaign please let him know so he can arrange an alternative opportunity for you.

Quietway – delayed??

Residents have received a letter through their doors saying works to install the Quietway will start next Monday 7 August.  This came as a surprise as the Council has not yet decided to proceed with the Quietway.

Council officers have made their final proposals and it is expected that just a rubber-stamp formal decision will be made, as we were previously told, by 27 July by the relevant Councillor.

That decision has not been made, so maybe there are further thoughts being had at the Town Hall.  Maybe Cllr Wingfield whose responsibility it is to make the final decision is having doubts.  Or perhaps he has just been too busy on a host of other matters which have taken precedence.

It seems the letters to residents have come out too quickly and before the decision has been made.  Village Councillor Jane Lyons tells us she expects  a decision TOMORROW and that the works will NOT start on Monday!

High air pollution in Dulwich Village

London Air has issued the following urgent health warning for HIGH levels of pollution along main roads and locations such as Dulwich Village:

An area of high pressure over the UK is resulting in calm, settled and cold conditions and poor dispersal of local pollutants.

Thursday is forecast to be slightly less cold with winds picking up a little which should lead to the currently elevated pollution levels clearing during the day. However, another cold night tonight with light winds is likely to result in further ‘moderate’ nitrogen dioxide at busy London roadsides on Thursday morning before conditions start to improve. There is also a chance of further ‘high’ and ‘moderate’ PM10 and PM2.5 if pollution is slow to clear.

Friday, early mist and fog will slowly clear to leave a mainly cloudy day with the possibility of patchy light rain in the east later. Even lighter winds than of late, and the early mist will likely cause another day of pollution build-up, escalated by the already elevated pollution levels.  Consequently, ‘Moderate’ levels of nitrogen dioxide are expected to occur close to busy road locations.

Furthermore, air will begin to arrive from the North-East later in the day and may import some polluted air as it passes near to industrialized areas of Western Europe. This incoming air will add to London’s local pollution burden and is likely to result in ‘Moderate’ levels of PM10 and PM2.5 particulates.