Parking – Crowds -Safety -Pollution

We may think of kerbsides as just space on the public highway next to the pavement.  But they are more than that.  Kerbsides include footpaths by the kerb and which might be widened for tree planting and street seating. They include the white posts and green verges we love in Dulwich.

There is great competition for the kerbsides from vehicles, cyclists, pedestrians, house occupants, push-chairs, etc. etc.  We know only too well how busy our kerbsides are at times and how they are hazardous for the unwary, the reckless and those of us who are a unsteady because of age, youth or illness.

Southwark Council recognises the need for a sensible management of kerbsides and is consulting on a ‘Kerbside Strategy’.  Southwark’s Kerbside strategy_Feb’17

The Council makes some important points for us to think about.  Among them are:

Demographic Pressure: The population is growing faster in Southwark than expected. At the last census in 2011 it was 288,000 and today is estimated to be 306,000. The government forecasts it will be 370,000 by 2031, an increase of 82,000 or 28% in 20 years!
Parking:  60% of Southwark households don’t own a vehicle, yet parking in the borough takes up an increasing amount of kerbside space. In our streets, however, many households own multiple cars and large ones at that.  Parking is the issue which sparks greatest interest in our streets.  There has to be an improvement in access to and usage of public transport.
Road Safety and the Environment: The Council wants to improve the lives  of older residents and to enable them to live independently for longer. Older people typically drive less and favour public transport. There are increasing numbers of older people in Southwark.  There is a demand for wider footpaths, more frequent and safer pedestrian crossings, accessible bus stops and uncluttered, pleasant neighbourhood centres to sit and relax in.
Traffic Collisions: More people walking or cycling in Southwark are killed or injured than in any other mode of transport. Road traffic accidents are increasing each year.  In 2015 there were over 1,000 in Southwark with 90 fatal ones.

Air quality:  According to the 2015 King’s College University report, up to 9,500 deaths in London each year can be linked to air pollution. Southwark’s road transport emissions are amongst the highest in London. There are a number of sites that exceed legal levels of NO2 (Southwark Air Quality Action Plan, 2013).  At peak traffic periods, Dulwich Village experiences poor air quality, right by the primary schools.

There are many competing demands which we are making and are set out in the Council’s draft strategy.  The council wants our views.

The consultation period on Southwark’s Kerbside Strategy has just started and closes on 28 April.

Front gardens in ugly Turney Road

Front garden layouts are a bugbear of Turney Road – ugly with so many unsightly car parks standing brutally in front of our fine Edwardian houses.

However with the influx of new residents paying high prices for their homes and investing even more into them, there has been a welcome increased resident acknowledgement that frontages are detracting from their homes and from the street.

In response the Scheme of Management has provided an example front garden layout for the houses in Turney Road, that are unable to comply with the Scheme of Management Guidelines for Hardstandings due to the small size of the front garden.  The example drawing is below and more information is on its website.  They form the basis of the Manager’s approach to an application to redesign a front garden.  Any queries should be referred to Nina Rees at the Scheme of Management office.

0206_001-1

Where residents intend to park a car on a forecourt they will need to apply to Southwark Council for permission to create a new entry into the highway – from the forecourt into the road.  The Council can give approval under planning and highways legislation to create a new kerb crossover onto the road.  The crossover is recognised by its ‘dropped’ kerb edge.

Quietway – breaking news!

At this week’s Dulwich Community Council (DCC) the meeting chair read out the following statement regarding Quietway 7.

“The cabinet member requested officers, following feedback at the last community council meeting, to reconsider various aspects of the design and related issues.  In particular officers were asked to conclude the Foundation Schools Coach service study (working in partnership with the Foundation schools) and this work has now been completed and an action plan around the high priority issues has been developed.  It is expected that this will lead to significant improvements in the impact of the service on the local community, including the removal of 10 of 11 coaches from Calton Avenue each morning and significantly less coach congestion on Townley Road in the afternoon.

He has also secured a commitment from Transport for London (TfL) to attend a stakeholder meeting in Dulwich in the coming weeks, and if the Quietway proposals are to proceed, the cabinet member is committed to continued working with TfL and the community on a holistic study of traffic issues in the Dulwich area over the next year.”

 

What changes does Sustrans suggest to turn our roads into a Quietway?

You can read the Sustrans Community Engagement Report at Sustrans Consultation Report

Sustrans spent several months meeting residents at workshops and meetings, and their conclusions regarding potential changes to Dulwich roads can be found in the report.

Most of the changes will be at the Dulwich Village junction.

What does this mean for Turney Road?

There are a number of potential changes proposed but nothing is yet set in stone, and there will be a formal consultation on potential changes in early 2016.  In the meantime, this is what we have gleaned from the Sustrans report.  There won’t be any painted or segregated cycle lanes but there could be:

  • closure of the Croxted Road end of Turney Road to non-resident motor traffic for  a) some of each day, or b)  all day;
  • removal of all or some of the pedestrian islands and their replacement by a smaller number of zebra crossings, without island refuges mid-way;
  • removal of white lines in the centre of the road;
  • reduction of ‘pinch points’ where they interrupt cyclists;
  • reduction of on-street parking;
  • a rule  (or at least encouragement) that all cars should be backed into front drives.

What do you think?  Please let us know via “Contact us”

Published SB 16/12/2015

Act now! Have your say on the proposed cycling Quietway through Dulwich. First Workshop 23 Sept 6.30 Dulwich Sports Ground, Turney Road

Whether we like it or not, a cycling Quietway is proposed for Dulwich Village.   The first Sustrans-led community engagement workshop is on Wednesday 23rd September 2015 6.30pm at the Dulwich Sports Ground (SCST) pavilion on Turney Road.  More details on this PDF file   HAVE YOUR SAY ON TURNEY QUIETWAY  or below

Quietway on Turney Road
                     Quietway on Turney Road

Have your say on the Quietways. Turney Road about to go through major changes.

BOOKMARK THIS PAGE FOR REGULAR UPDATES

Current Status (Nov 2015): Community engagement has completed.  Awaiting the Sustrans reports to Southwark and Lambeth and the next steps in consultation.

Southwark and Lambeth plan to route a Quietway through Dulwich Village down Green Dale, Calton Avenue, Turney Road and Rosendale Road.

They appointed Sustrans to conduct a community engagement exercise which started in July 2015 and completed in October 2015.

Residents participated in the following events:

Event: Three walkabouts at peak traffic in Dulwich taking in the section of route Q7 from Calton Ave – Rosendale Road. Discussion on issues and points to consider in the workshops with an optional pop up event focused on Lambeth interventions at the end.  17th September 2015

Event: Design development workshop – Discussions on possible interventions working in small groups, identifying preferred opportunities to calm traffic along Calton Ave / Dulwich Village Junction / Turney Road. 23rd and 26th September 2015

Event: Concept Design workshop – Narrowing down the options and coming to a consensus on one or two concept designs to be worked up further by Southwark Council for inclusion in the informal consultation. 3rd and 6th October 2015.

There were also events in Lambeth which completed in October 2015.

You can find out more about the Quietway in these documents:

Southwark Walkabout in Turney Road Feb 2015 Turney Road Site Walkthrough with the Residents’ Association

Turney Road Discussion Paper Feb 2015

Turney Road Plan 1 – Feb 2015

Turney Road Plan 2 – Feb 2015

Turney Road Map – Feb 2015

Southwark Cycling Strategy – Final Approved Version – Cycling Strategy

Turney Road Cycling Meeting 18 April 2015 – Turney Residents have their say

TRRA – Quietways Meeting 18 April 2015 – Powerpoint – Background info

COUNCIL CYCLING MEET – Dulwich Society meeting with Cllr Mark Williams May 2015

T & T Minutes 29 June 2015 – Dulwich Society Traffic & Transport Ctte with Sustrans

Note of meeting with Sustrans about the proposed Quietway down Turney Road 30 June 2015

Dulwich Quietway Flyer – on street popups July 2015

Dulwich survey results Infographic report from our survey results so far in Dulwich Village around the proposed Quietway route.August 2015

Dulwich Quietways Sustrans Q & A Quietway Questions & Answers August 2015

More information will be found here on this blog after Friday 28th August 2015: https://consultations.southwark.gov.uk/environment-leisure/quietway-in-dulwich

Meeting with Cabinet Member, Cllr Darren Merrill, Southwark Council – Minutes 19 August 2015

Our Turney Road flyer: https://turneyandburbage.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/quietways-21st-september-v2.png

There is also an interactive map on the Southwark web site to add comments about the Quietway http://www.sdgdigital.co.uk/sites/southwarkquietways/

Sustrans Community Engagement Report  for Southwark – November 2015

https://consultations.southwark.gov.uk/environment-leisure/quietway-in-dulwich/consult_view

 

And here is the route:

Route of Quietway through Dulwich
Route of Quietway through Dulwich

TIMESCALE FOR CONSULTATION

    • Initial engagement with schools, parents and residents  – July 2015 – complete
    • Questionnaire to all residents in (wide) catchment area – Late August 2015 – complete
    • Pre-design workshops with maps & modelling tools,  and walkabouts – September – complete
    • Report on Southwark Sustrans Community Engagement – December 2015
    • Lambeth proposed designs – December 2015
    • Formal Design (with Southwark engineering input)  – January 2016
    • Consultation  on proposed options – Jan – Feb 2016
    • Report to DCC – March 2016
    • Final Approval (Cabinet Level) – April 2016
    • Implementation – Summer 2016

Published: Sue Badman, July 2015

Updated: Sue Badman 26/8/2015, 2/11/2015

New policy on road markings adjacent to crossovers

Response from Southwark Council to Member enquiry from Cllr Jane Lyons regarding the proposed implementation of double yellow lines adjacent to crossovers to private drives.

Our Reference: 495472

Dear Councillor Lyons

Thank you for your enquiry dated 9 February 2015 in which you requested information regarding the policy on road markings adjacent to crossovers on behalf of your constituent Mr Ian McInnes (Chair of the Dulwich Society).

The council has three Design Standards that are pertinent to your enquiry:

I can summarise these standards as follows, the council:

  • will not install any new white H-Bar markings and will remove existing features as opportunity arises (eg. road resurfacing or a highway project)
  • will apply double yellow lines across new vehicle crossovers
  • will extend those double yellow lines for a length not less than 2 metres beyond the extent of the crossover (length will depend upon road classification)

For clarity, these policies mostly concern themselves with new crossovers. For the reasons given below, we do plan to remove existing H-Bars as opportunity arises but these will not be replaced by yellow lines unless a specific need is identified (and any new yellow lines will be subject to consultation). I note Mr McInnes’ concern that double yellow lines remove some flexibility about house owners allowing friends etc to park in front of their existing drive.

Historically H Bar markings were placed on streets as the council did not have the power to enforce against vehicles which were parked over a dropped kerb. The council now has the power to enforce such illegal parking. As such, the council considers the advisory H-bar to be an unnecessary road marking that brings little benefit. Most dropped kerbs are very obvious and therefore do not require additional signage to point them out. Consequently, the Council has ceased the installation of H-bar markings and now undertakes a policy of removing the existing markings when practicable.

For residents that are concerned that their driveway will be blocked in the absence of an ‘H bar’, the council will take enforcement action against vehicles that block access, however this service requires the explicit ‘opting in’ from the resident concerned.  More details of this policy and how to request the service can be found here.

In respect of Mr McInnes’ question about consultation, the Southwark Streetscape Design Manual (SSDM) was approved by Individual Decision by the relevant Cabinet Member in December 2012 after a public consultation and Equality Impact Assessment. The approved structure authorises the Head of Public Realm to agree individual design standards via the council’s scheme of delegation. The three standards you are enquiring about (DS. 002, 007 and 114) were approved in May and December 2013.
Should you have any questions about this response please do not hesitate to contact me on 02075252021 or email Tim.Walker@southwark.gov.uk.

 

Yours sincerely,

 
Tim Walker
Senior Engineer
Tooley St – Third Floor, Hub 1
PO Box 64529
London
SE1P 5LX
Tim.Walker@southwark.gov.uk